React Router: useParams & useSearchParams Hooks

Last updated on May 4, 2022 A Goodman Loading... Post a comment

This article is about the useParams and useSearchParams hooks that come with React Router. We’ll cover the fundamentals of these hooks and then walk through a complete example of using them in practice.

useParams hook

The useParams hook is used to read the dynamic params from the current URL that were matched by <Route path>. For example, if a route looks like this:

/some-path/:name/:id

Then the useParams hook will return an object with key/value pairs looking like so:

{
   name: <some value>,
   id: <some value>
}

Example

Preview:

The tiny app we’re going to build consists of two pages: Home and Post. The path of the Post page looks like this:

/post/:id/:slug

The user can navigate to the Post page by using one of the links on Home page. Here’s how it works:

The full code:

import {
  Routes,
  Route,
  BrowserRouter,
  Link,
  useParams,
} from 'react-router-dom'

function App() {
  return (
    <BrowserRouter>
      <Routes>
        <Route path='/' element={<Home />} />
        <Route path='/post/:id/:slug' element={<Post />} />
      </Routes>
    </BrowserRouter>
  );
}

// Home page
// Route: /
const Home = () => {
  return <div style={{ padding: 30 }}>
    <p><Link to={`/post/123/hello-world`}>/post/123/hello-world</Link></p>
    <p><Link to={`/post/456/goodbye-moon`}>/post/345/goodbye-moon</Link></p>
  </div>
}

// Post page
// Route: /post/:id/:slug
const Post = () => {
  const params = useParams();
  return <div style={{ padding: 30 }}>
    <h1>ID: {params.id}</h1>
    <h2>Slug: {params.slug}</h2>
  </div>
}


export default App;

useSearchParams hook

The useSearchParams hook is used to Read and Modify the query string in the URL for the current location. Similar to the useState hook of React, the useSearchParams hook of React Router returns an array with two elements: the first is the current location’s search params and the latter is a function that can be used to update them:

import { useSearchParams } from 'react-router-dom';

const App = () => {
   const [searchParams, setSearchParams] = useSearchParams();
   return /* ... */
}

To see how it works in action, move on to the following example.

Example

Preview

In this small example, when the text in the search field changes, the search portion of the URL changes too (the part after the question mark ?):

The complete code:

import {
  Routes,
  Route,
  BrowserRouter,
  useSearchParams
} from 'react-router-dom'

function App() {
  return (
    <BrowserRouter>
      <Routes>
        <Route path='/' element={<Search />} />
      </Routes>
    </BrowserRouter>
  );
}

// Search page
const Search = () => {
  const [searchParams, setSearchParams] = useSearchParams();

  // This function will be called whenever the text input changes
  const searchHandler = (event) => {
    let search;
    if (event.target.value) {
      search = {
        keyword: event.target.value
      }
    } else {
      search = undefined;
    }

    setSearchParams(search, { replace: true });
  }

  return <div style={{ padding: 50 }}>
    <input
      value={searchParams.keyword}
      onChange={searchHandler}
      placeholder='Search...'
      style={{ width: '300px', padding: '8px 15px', fontSize: '16px' }}
    />
  </div>
}


export default App;

Conclusion

We’ve learned almost everything about the useParams and useSearchParams hooks. From this point, you can make use of them to solve your problems creatively and flexibly. If you’d like to explore more new and interesting stuff about modern React, take a look at the following articles:

You can also check our React topic page and Next.js topic page for the latest tutorials and examples.

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